Politics

Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick Blasts Pro-Critical Race Theory Resolution


Trump rally in Conroe

Source: Anadolu Agency / Getty

Here’s a question about the Republican war on critical race theory: What is it supposed to accomplish?

Obviously, the goal is to ban any curriculum that gets white people all in their feel-feels into oblivion, but what do they think that is going to do? End discussions about systemic racism and white privilege? Slowly erode all race-related debates altogether? Bring “I don’t see color” America to fruition? Keep the negroes in their place? Because banning CRT will do none of that.

Almost no one outside of academia knew of CRT before Republicans discovered it was a good and scary base-galvanizing issue they could bring up to keep red states red and possibly swing the racism in swing states all the way to the ballot box. But now that it’s out there and when we’re debating around it, we’re talking very publicly about systemic racism and white privilege as we’re seeing those concepts unfold in real-time. We’re seeing white legislatorswho have not even remotely demonstrated knowledge of what CRT is and are instead using it as an umbrella term for all things that make the whites uncomfortable (*gestures widely towards everything Black*)proposing and passing laws specifically designed for white people’s comfort that everyone of every other race will be affected by.

White people aren’t ending the fight against white supremacy by banning CRT, they’re fueling it.

Anyway, in Texaswhere banning Blackness from education is as American as apple pie, baseball, and hanging negroes from trees then pretending it didn’t happen—the “Faculty Council at the University of Texas approved a nonbinding resolution Monday defending the academic freedom of faculty members to teach about race, gender justice, and critical race theory,” according to the Austin American-Statesman.

Now, nonbinding resolutions don’t mean much in terms of enforceable policy, but this one at least shows that people in Texas who are actually involved in education are fighting for educators’ freedom to actually educate without having to dilute their lessons in white tears. The resolution was approved 41-5 with three members abstaining from the vote and it “affirms that educators, not politicians, should make decisions about teaching and learning, and supports the rights and academic freedom of faculty to design courses, curriculum, and pedagogy, and to conduct related scholarly research.”

“State legislative proposals seeking to limit teaching and discussions of racism and related issues have been proposed and enacted in several states, including Texas,” the resolution continued, referring to states across the country that are passing white fragility legislation at the expense of anyone who wishes to see a truthful and unfiltered version of America’s history and present taught. “This resolution affirms the fundamental rights of faculty to academic freedom in its broadest sense, inclusive of research and teaching of race and gender theory.”

Of course, Texas Lt. Gov Dan Patrick was apparently not too happy about the passing of the resolution, and he got his Klan-derwear all in a bunch while taking to Twitter to express his resentment.

“I will not stand by and let looney Marxist UT professors poison the minds of young students with Critical Race Theory. We banned it in publicly funded K-12 and we will ban it in publicly funded higher ed,” Patrick huffed and puffed. “That’s why we created the Liberty Institute at UT.”

The irony is that the war against CRT will inevitably become a part of American history anti-CRT advocates want banned because all it will show is that conservative white people are always on the wrong side of history. Always.

SEE ALSO: 

Fed-Up Black Mississippi Senators Walkout Of Vote On Anti-Critical Race Theory Bill

New Virginia Governor Glenn Youngkin Unveils ‘Day One’ Executive Order Banning Critical Race Theory

49 photos

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top button